how do you play .ass files?

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im new to downloading subbed batsu games being i usually watch them on youtube but since some are being removed or have crappy quality (cough24hourtagcough) i decided to download the subbed batsu game.

but i have no idea what the heck a .ass file is....how do i play those?

do i need to download like 4 different things? or do i just need to download a media player that can play those things? any help would be great.

Bonus Question: ive been watchin gaki alot and ive always wanted to know from the start...what type of japanese are they speaking?

i heard romanji is the one that everyone uses which is wat im trying to learn....but i have a feeling its maybe katakana...idk please answer that for me.
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You are talking about the writing system: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_language#Writing_system

You can use VLC Player for example. The ass file needs to have the same name as the avi file. Video.avi and Video.ass for example, then you start Video.avi normal and the subtitle comes automatic.
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Romanji is the romanisation of the sounds that correspond to the japanese writing..

But to properly answer your "bonus" question..

they're speaking Kansai Dialect, more than likely Osaka-ben
UWAAAAAAAA~!!

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Originally posted by misterpimp5757
im new to downloading subbed batsu games being i usually watch them on youtube but since some are being removed or have crappy quality (cough24hourtagcough) i decided to download the subbed batsu game.

but i have no idea what the heck a .ass file is....how do i play those?

do i need to download like 4 different things? or do i just need to download a media player that can play those things? any help would be great.

Bonus Question: ive been watchin gaki alot and ive always wanted to know from the start...what type of japanese are they speaking?

i heard romanji is the one that everyone uses which is wat im trying to learn....but i have a feeling its maybe katakana...idk please answer that for me.


The .ass file is the file containing the subs for the video in question, that's it it doesn't have the video in it which is why its so small. What you must have is both the .ass and the video file.

Ok once you have both of those downloaded, in a video player like VLC (download it if you don't have it) while playing the video you can right click and go to video then either subtitle or title (I can't remember what the menu is called in english, I use a Japanese version of VLC) then click browse. There you can search for the .ass file and it will load it into the video.

Really the only good thing about .ass files is that people who already have downloaded the video can quickly get the video going. The downside is they generally tend to be a lot less neater than pure hardsubbing. This is more due to the limitations of the filetype itself moreso than anything. However, some people can really make good .ass files.

Moving onto the bonus question.

Romaji, Katakana, Hiragana, and Kanji are all WRITING systems of Japanese. As in they are what Japanese people use to write things, not different styles of Japanese itself.

Romaji are the Romanization of the Japanese Hiragana and Katakana. Romaji was really only invented as a learning tool for us non-native Japanese speakers. It is also used when typing Japanese, instead of having 46 keys with the 46 base hiragana on them to type they just type using a standard Qwerty keyboard and type the romaji equivalent of each hiragana. (The former method I talk about exists but is very uncommon).

Hiragana are the most commonly used writing system in Japan. Hiragana is used in many ways. The first and most commonly seen is as okurigana which is basically when you have kanji followed by hiragana to conjugate a verb into the tenses and levels of politeness. The Japanese use a system of particles to mark what is the subject, direct object and etc. to denote how verbs affect the things in the sentence and etc. Hiragana is used for these as well. Hiragana is also used a furigana or smaller characters above kanji to allow Japanese to read difficult to read kanji and/or to teach Japanese children.

Katakana are the same thing just used differently and looks differently. Katakana are used with foreign borrowed words (Like bus is basu in Japanese and would be spelled with katakana). Katakana is also used for english names written in Japanese. Finally it is used for telegrams, and some cheaper forms of cell phone texting... Although the texting concept I'm not too sure as I think the technology has advanced to allowing kanji.

Kanji are Chinese characters that are used to express certain ideas or thoughts. They are used for verbs and overall are nice for condensing the amount of space needed to write something. They also make reused sounds more specific. Like "ashi" means foot or leg, but the kanji for leg and foot are different so when written it looks different but when spoken it sounds the same. Kanji also looks just badass.

Really there are only 3 writing systems, Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Romaji isn't even really Japanese and is hardly ever used in Japan. There are times where it exists but none that I can really classify and list other than actually writing in english.

So the Gaki no Tsukai crew really uses all three hiragana, katakana, and kanji, but not while talking usually.

Now they do speak a different "type" of Japanese though.

There is the standard Japanese which is what you'll find primarily in Tokyo, but in other regions you'll find different dialects of Japanese. The Gaki no Tsukai TV show is based in the Kansai region and thus have a Kansai dialect. This is probably what you are thinking of when takling about the type of Japnese they speak.
Originally posted by DemonicDerek

Moving onto the bonus question.

Romaji, Katakana, Hiragana, and Kanji are all WRITING systems of Japanese. As in they are what Japanese people use to write things, not different styles of Japanese itself.

Romaji are the Romanization of the Japanese Hiragana and Katakana. Romaji was really only invented as a learning tool for us non-native Japanese speakers. It is also used when typing Japanese, instead of having 46 keys with the 46 base hiragana on them to type they just type using a standard Qwerty keyboard and type the romaji equivalent of each hiragana. (The former method I talk about exists but is very uncommon).

Hiragana are the most commonly used writing system in Japan. Hiragana is used in many ways. The first and most commonly seen is as okurigana which is basically when you have kanji followed by hiragana to conjugate a verb into the tenses and levels of politeness. The Japanese use a system of particles to mark what is the subject, direct object and etc. to denote how verbs affect the things in the sentence and etc. Hiragana is used for these as well. Hiragana is also used a furigana or smaller characters above kanji to allow Japanese to read difficult to read kanji and/or to teach Japanese children.

Katakana are the same thing just used differently and looks differently. Katakana are used with foreign borrowed words (Like bus is basu in Japanese and would be spelled with katakana). Katakana is also used for english names written in Japanese. Finally it is used for telegrams, and some cheaper forms of cell phone texting... Although the texting concept I'm not too sure as I think the technology has advanced to allowing kanji.

Kanji are Chinese characters that are used to express certain ideas or thoughts. They are used for verbs and overall are nice for condensing the amount of space needed to write something. They also make reused sounds more specific. Like "ashi" means foot or leg, but the kanji for leg and foot are different so when written it looks different but when spoken it sounds the same. Kanji also looks just badass.

Really there are only 3 writing systems, Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Romaji isn't even really Japanese and is hardly ever used in Japan. There are times where it exists but none that I can really classify and list other than actually writing in english.

So the Gaki no Tsukai crew really uses all three hiragana, katakana, and kanji, but not while talking usually.

Now they do speak a different "type" of Japanese though.

There is the standard Japanese which is what you'll find primarily in Tokyo, but in other regions you'll find different dialects of Japanese. The Gaki no Tsukai TV show is based in the Kansai region and thus have a Kansai dialect. This is probably what you are thinking of when takling about the type of Japnese they speak.



Thanks for the post, it makes some more sense now for a non-japanese speaker like me
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